Research

NOCC SUPPORTS OVARIAN CANCER RESEARCH

The NOCC is committed to furthering research efforts that focus on better detecting ovarian cancer and improving quality of life. Read about NOCC-funded projects below and follow these links to read about participating in clinical trials and for the latest ovarian cancer news.

2011 NOCC RESEARCH INITIATIVE:
THE ANN SCHREIBER OVARIAN CANCER RESEARCH TRAINING PROGRAM OF EXCELLENCE: A STUDY BY DR. RUTH PERETS

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer in the United States.

  • In 85 percent of cases, the malignancy is detected when it has already spread beyond the ovaries.
  • It has been difficult to determine where ovarian cancer originates.

Researchers have suggested that ovarian cancer may originate in the fallopian tubes—not the ovary—a hypothesis that could have a significant impact on early detection and prevention of ovarian cancer.

In 2011, NOCC awarded a $50,000 grant to support research being conducted by Dr. Ruth Perets, MD, Ph.D. and colleagues. The objective of the research is to test whether the fallopian tube is the origin site of ovarian cancer.

There were two parts to the research which were different, but connected.

  • The first aim was to study the role of the protein PAX8. It is expressed in fallopian tube cells and in the vast majority of ovarian cancers.

Dr. Perets’ study has shown that PAX8 is an essential protein for normal fallopian tube cells and for ovarian cancer. Therefore, PAX8 can serve as a future target for ovarian cancer therapy.

  • The second was to show that the fallopian tube can be the organ where ovarian cancers originate.

To test this hypothesis, the research team made a mouse model in which the fallopian tubes, but not the ovaries, contain genetic changes frequently found in ovarian cancer. Confirming the team’s hypothesis, the mice developed tumors that are indistinguishable from human ovarian cancer. Therefore the model supports the hypothesis that ovarian cancer can originate in the fallopian tube.

2012 & 2013 RESEARCH INITIATIVE: LIvES STUDY*

NOCC supports Quality of Life research and contributed an initial $50,000 to the GOG 0225, LIvES Study.

Few trials have been conducted in the areas of diet and physical activity, though growing evidence suggests both may play an integral role in ovarian cancer. The LIvES study will recruit 1,070 stage II-IV ovarian, primary peritoneal and fallopian tube cancer survivors from GOG clinics across the country.

  • The study will use an innovative combination of telephone and web-based coaching software system designed specifically for GOG 0225.
  • Each woman will be randomly assigned to either the intervention or usual care group. Both groups will receive telephone-based coaching from the University of Arizona Cancer Center.
  • The study participants will be contacted by the University of Arizona Cancer Center a minimum of 22 times over the 2-year period.
  • Women will be asked to fill out questionnaires regarding their diet, physical activity, other lifestyle and health issues, and overall quality of life. Blood samples will also be collected.

The NOCC is committed to this research endeavor and working with the researchers to further explore the role that lifestyle may have regarding ovarian cancer. Read more about participating in this trial at www.ovarianlives.org

*The LIvES Study is supported in part by grant number CA101165 from the National Cancer Center of the National Institutes of Health.

NOCC SUPPORTS OVARIAN CANCER ADVOCACY

NOCC recognizes the importance of uniting our voice with our sister organizations and other cancer groups to ignite change throughout the country.

There are a multitude of important issues that local governments and Washington D.C. must address, including everything from research and healthcare coverage to legal rights. NOCC carefully considers its positions on matters that impact survivors, caregivers, loved ones, women with cancer and the general population, before signing on to letters submitted to Congress and supporting lobbying efforts. NOCC will continue to aid in the fight for the issues that matter most to the ovarian cancer community.

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